Top

Tag Archives | Safety

Safety is the state of being “safe”, the condition of being protected against physical, or other types or consequences of failure, damage, error, accidents, harm, or any other event that could be considered non-desirable. It can include protection of people or of equipment.

Top 5 Reasons to Update Your Controls

Concept Systems, Inc. manages robotic vision technologies from start to finish. We first meet with a company that has production problems. These may be related to inefficient machinery, hazardous equipment usage, or simply not having a system that allows them to keep up with client demand for their products. Concept systems, Inc. will talk with a company about their current problem and brainstorm solutions where updated technology would be beneficial.

From here, we design from scratch or redesign current robotic controllers to become more capable of performing their designated tasks. Robotic vision has helped a variety of industries meet their unique production needs in a way that provides both consumer satisfaction and profitable returns for the company. Here are 5 reasons why businesses should consider updating their production controls and machinery.

Increase Productivity

Utilizing enhanced machine vision can increase a company’s production significantly. When the controlling technology is able to make better scans of the product, then the production process is able to speed up and put out a higher volume of work. If the technology is not currently being used at all, it can be programmed to take on a larger workload.

Efficiency and Accuracy

With increased speed comes higher efficiency and accuracy. Not only is the production line moving at a steadier pace, but the number of errors occurring during production is also cut down. This is a big bonus of having robotic vision. Human error is inevitable, but robotic technologies have little to no error when programmed and function correctly.

Less Waste

The good consequence of practically nonexistent error margins is less waste of materials and time during production and processing. This is a win for the company and the environment. Fewer resources are needed to get the job done and the resources that are used get used more fully. With less waste, the company invests less money into materials costs.

Larger Profits

Less money wasted on material costs is just part of the profits made by the company. With all the increases in efficiency and production, the company is able to get more products made or items processed through their lines and shipped out to where they need to go. Investment in robotic vision will definitely see an eventual retrieval of monies spent.

Better Safety

With robot guidance, the machines can replace or change some of the dangerous jobs once left to company workers. Special scanners and controls can be programmed to do the work in areas that are not safe for people to be around. Share a new company vision with Concept Systems, Inc.!

Key Methods of Robotic Vision Technology

The idea of a machine being able to see, interpret, and respond to information based on visual input alone is not just science fiction. Robotic vision technologies have become an integral component to manufacturing, as well as packing and shipping, and continue to grow in other industries as well.

Appropriate lighting is the most significant factor in ensuring that these technologies are working properly, and we’ve compiled a few tips for creating the best lighting solutions for robotic vision systems that help ensure the safety and efficiency of your technology and your team.

Bright Lights

If you’re working with molds and are trying to identify missing material in the mold or product, a short shot can help you out. This is a short burst of bright light that quickly illuminates inconsistencies in a mold from above. This method requires the container of the target object to have a flat top surface; otherwise, what the robot sees would be distorted. Any coarse or rough textures on the top surface of the mold also make the images a little spotty.

Wavelength

On an assembly line for electronics, robotic vision is what helps machines detect if parts are oriented correctly as they pass on down the line so that they’re able to be put together properly. Different colors emit different wavelengths when reflecting light, and you can get equipment that reads the distinctions in wavelengths to quickly determine the variety of materials in your assembly line. This could be the difference between a part being put in with the correct orientation or not.

Nondiffused Light

When it comes to glass or other transparent products, especially when they’re blazing past employees on an assembly line, small cracks or fractures in the material can be difficult to detect with the naked eye. Nondiffused light provides an efficient solution, as it essentially shows up on these robotic vision screens as a bright accent in a very dark image—any brightness highlights the imperfection.

Diffuse Light

Your teacher in grade school may have challenged you to estimate how many marbles were in the prize jar, but manufacturing a jar with an exact amount of marbles inside requires far more precision and much less guesswork. Using diffuse light in robotic vision technology is essentially bathing the object in light from every direction to remove any shadow. The image created from this technique can be quickly assessed for missing volume content.

Vision technologies rely heavily on light to produce accurate images, so choosing the right lighting for your workcell is important. If you are considering integrating vision technology into your plant processes and aren’t sure where to start, send us an email at contact-us@conceptsystemsinc.com.

Improving Automation

We’ve come a long way, but we still have a long way to go.

Automation may seem like a relatively modern concept, with its buzzworthy contribution to the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and already monumental importance to the future of global enterprise. However, the technological birth of automation as we know it today dates back centuries.
BilletID
The first recorded use of automation control was a feedback control mechanism used to tent the sails of windmills, patented by English inventor Edmund Lee in 1775. Automation came to America in the late 18th century with the centrifugal governor, invented by Scottish mechanical engineer James Watt in 1788 to help regulate the admission of steam into the cylinders of his steam engine. American inventor and engineer Oliver Evans later used the centrifugal governor to adjust the gaps between millstones in his automatic flour mill, making this the first completely automated industrial process in history.

The innovations snowballed from there, culminating in a present-day automation boom. In 2016, automated mining, retail, security systems, highway systems, waste management systems, homes, offices, and industrial plants are no longer pipe dreams, but exciting realities with lush opportunities for growth.

For a more detailed assessment of automation’s leaps and bounds over the past few years, Quality asked two automation insiders for their takes: John Neeley, product manager of mobility solutions at Fluke Corp.; and Michael Lindley, vice president of business development and marketing at Concept Systems Inc.

What recent strides has your company made toward improving automation, and how do these strides fit into the broader automation landscape? Continue Reading →

Concept Systems named Rockwell Automation Machinery Safety Solution Partner

Microsoft Word - Unofficial Safety Logo[1].docxAlbany, Ore. (Nov. 30, 2015) – Concept Systems, a Rockwell Automation Solution Partner company specializing in manufacturing automation, vision and robotic solutions, and machinery safety, announced that it has demonstrated the requisite expertise and experience to become a Rockwell Automation Machinery Safety Solution Partner. This designation is reserved for an elite group of systems integrators that pass a thorough assessment of their safety application expertise, experience and capabilities, and show a long-term commitment to maintaining excellence in machinery safety applications. All Solution Partners, as part of the Rockwell Automation PartnerNetwork program, have committed to an active, extensive relationship with Rockwell Automation to provide the most productive and cost-effective automation solutions for their customers.

“We are very happy to add Concept Systems as a Machinery Safety Solution Partner,” said Mark Eitzman, manager of safety market development at Rockwell Automation. “The company’s technical expertise and experience has shown that they are capable of delivering systems that improve both safety and productivity, making them a good fit in our program.” Continue Reading →

How Safety Technology Can Increase Productivity

Elimination of physical barriers to production equipment is key to improving productivity. To get started, however, you must begin with a safety assessment.

valuesIn my last several blogs, I wrote about the importance of developing an Automation Roadmap and how to create one for yourself. I am wrapping up the sequence with two topics that often fall off the radar during planning—your network infrastructure and safety. In my last blog, I went into detail about the network side of things. This blog addresses the importance of considering safety at the planning stage.

Manufacturing processes and operational intelligence have benefitted from the rapid advance of technology. Safety has, too. Historically, the most common way to safeguard workers in and around manufacturing equipment was to provide physical barriers between workers and operating equipment. While this type of safety system both provides for safe operation and maintenance as well as meets the appropriate codes, it limits productivity. Continue Reading →

Automation Roadmap: Assessing Your Network Architecture

To facilitate efficient and cost-effective process improvement, your network architecture needs to be thoughtfully planned out, not just patched together.

By now, you know you want to create an automation roadmap that aligns with corporate goals, which typically center on production, efficiency or quality gains. In my last couple of blogs (accessible here and here), I provided a structured approach to developing your automation roadmap, which generates a nice list of projects, in order of priority, accompanied by budget and timeline considerations. But before you make your way to the corporate offices to garner budget approval, there are a couple of additional considerations that will add the finishing touches to your automation roadmap: network architecture and safety. In this post I’ll address network architecture; next month I will address safety. Continue Reading →