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Creating a Foolproof Automation System for Your Business

In an age with increasing costs and additional demands, finding a way to automate some business processes using technology may be the key to solving problems. At Concept Systems, our engineers are problem solvers who use the latest in technology to create foolproof automation systems for businesses.

There are 2 primary reasons businesses choose to automate some or all of their processes whether those processes are related to production or fulfillment. First, manual processes are costly, and employee skills can be better allocated if the repetitive tasks are done by machinery. Already, engineers are hard at work designing robotic controllers that can grind and brew coffee to order and machines that can be used to eliminate weeds without the use of herbicides on corporate farms.

Second, automation increases production. Automating a manufacturing operation typically means increased production rates and labor productivity. In the simplest terms, business owners get more output per labor hour.

So how do Concept Systems engineers hammer out a robotic vision and controller for a specific industry or organization?

We start with a problem. When we kick-off a project, we spend time getting to know the full scope of a project and the necessary elements for success. The proposal to solving your problem will include the cost and a schedule. Fully understanding the problem and developing ideas for an automated solution or upgrade to your existing processes requires a bit of time as we determine what your system will do and how it will work. Our engineers work with key players in your company to draft on paper an elegant system including materials, electrical schematics and software.

For example, for a coffee roasting company, we upgraded a robot that was designed to unload pallets full of raw coffee beans and place the bags on a conveyor belt to send to the roaster. The robot’s vice grips, however, were a problem and often tore bags and spilled beans.

A Concept System team met with company stakeholders to design pneumatically-operated tines that eliminated tearing as well as a control system with 3D vision and advanced software to precisely position bags on the pallet.

Once a company approves a design, Concept Systems engineers get to work creating software and hardware to alleviate or solve the problem. This phase of development involves procuring materials, assembling the project, and testing.

During the final phase of development, engineers work closely with vendors at the factory or operation site to ensure proper installation of equipment and to train personnel to support and maintain the automated system.

Automation and robotics are the wave of the future. With specially engineered tools and resources, a team of engineers can create a foolproof automation system for your business and move your company into the future today. Contact us today to get started!

Boeing retools Renton plant for 737’s big ramp-up

After finishing systems installation, a Boeing 737 is prepared for wing installation at Boeing’s 737 assembly plant in Renton. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

After finishing systems installation, a Boeing 737 is prepared for wing installation at Boeing’s 737 assembly plant in Renton. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Boeing is transforming its 737 plant in Renton with new automation as it prepares to ramp up production to the unprecedented rate of 52 jets per month, or even more.

Six shiny, green 737 fuselage shells, freshly delivered by train from Wichita, Kan., sit snugly cradled in a steel superstructure like giant eggs in a carton at Boeing’s Renton factory.

Underneath, swarming mechanics install the guts of each airplane — wads of insulation blankets, snaking bundles of electrical wiring, intricately intertwined metal hydraulic tubes and pumps.

But despite appearances, those fuselages aren’t trapped in steel.

Soon, the steel walkways encasing the jets will lift away like drawbridges, freeing the fuselages to slide 150 feet forward during the night into the next position in Boeing’s newest moving assembly line.

The factory, already a showcase of efficiency with its two final-assembly lines churning out 42 of the single-aisle jets monthly, is gearing up by 2018 to build them at a prodigious pace of 52 a month — and later perhaps even more.

A key step is extending the use of moving assembly lines to the back-end shops where mechanics build the wings and stuff those fuselage shells. Continue Reading →