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Key Methods of Robotic Vision Technology

The idea of a machine being able to see, interpret, and respond to information based on visual input alone is not just science fiction. Robotic vision technologies have become an integral component to manufacturing, as well as packing and shipping, and continue to grow in other industries as well.

Appropriate lighting is the most significant factor in ensuring that these technologies are working properly, and we’ve compiled a few tips for creating the best lighting solutions for robotic vision systems that help ensure the safety and efficiency of your technology and your team.

Bright Lights

If you’re working with molds and are trying to identify missing material in the mold or product, a short shot can help you out. This is a short burst of bright light that quickly illuminates inconsistencies in a mold from above. This method requires the container of the target object to have a flat top surface; otherwise, what the robot sees would be distorted. Any coarse or rough textures on the top surface of the mold also make the images a little spotty.

Wavelength

On an assembly line for electronics, robotic vision is what helps machines detect if parts are oriented correctly as they pass on down the line so that they’re able to be put together properly. Different colors emit different wavelengths when reflecting light, and you can get equipment that reads the distinctions in wavelengths to quickly determine the variety of materials in your assembly line. This could be the difference between a part being put in with the correct orientation or not.

Nondiffused Light

When it comes to glass or other transparent products, especially when they’re blazing past employees on an assembly line, small cracks or fractures in the material can be difficult to detect with the naked eye. Nondiffused light provides an efficient solution, as it essentially shows up on these robotic vision screens as a bright accent in a very dark image—any brightness highlights the imperfection.

Diffuse Light

Your teacher in grade school may have challenged you to estimate how many marbles were in the prize jar, but manufacturing a jar with an exact amount of marbles inside requires far more precision and much less guesswork. Using diffuse light in robotic vision technology is essentially bathing the object in light from every direction to remove any shadow. The image created from this technique can be quickly assessed for missing volume content.

Vision technologies rely heavily on light to produce accurate images, so choosing the right lighting for your workcell is important. If you are considering integrating vision technology into your plant processes and aren’t sure where to start, send us an email at contact-us@conceptsystemsinc.com.